Author Archives: Lawson Bader

Lawson Bader

About Lawson Bader

Since 2015, Lawson Bader serves as president and CEO of DonorsTrust and Donors Capital Fund. Before coming to DonorsTrust, he amassed twenty years’ experience leading free-market research and advocacy groups including the Competitive Enterprise Institute and the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. He began his career in DC in as special assistant at the U.S. Senate Committee on Veterans Affairs, then worked as a legislative analyst/paralegal with Pierson, Semmes & Finley, and managed government relations at SRI International. He is a former weekly columnist with Human Events, and a current contributor to Kiplinger and member of the Forbes Nonprofit Council. He also serves on the governing boards of the Atlas Network, State Policy Network, and Oakseed Ministries International. Lawson earned a BA in political science from Wheaton College (IL) and an MA in public policy from The Johns Hopkins University.
Supporting International Groups Through DonorsTrust

Supporting International Groups Through DonorsTrust

A global recession aside, the U.S. is the world’s most prosperous country. It also is a place where general notions of personal and economic liberty are ingrained in its DNA. While its practices do not always meet expectations, it remains a beacon for the ideas of personal responsibility, free association, and free enterprise.

The U.S. also has a broad network …

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Cultivating Philanthropic Partnerships Will Get Us Through This Season

Cultivating Philanthropic Partnerships Will Get Us Through This Season

It was August the year we moved into our current house. The air was still sticky thick and the foliage a deep-vined green. Two months later, the kaleidoscope of fall’s foliage exploded among our woods, replaced soon thereafter by a particularly icy, cold winter.

When Spring arrived, I discovered I had seven dogwood trees nestled by our rear deck. Azalea …

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Reflecting on 2019 to Bring Hope to Today

Reflecting on 2019 to Bring Hope to Today

It’s an interesting process to reflect on last year amidst this current season of trials. However, it’s true that hard times put the past into perspective.

While the coronavirus makes 2020’s prospects unclear, the lessons 2019 taught us bring renewed hope to the principles we hold dear.

Our 2019 Progress Report highlights why we are able to remain optimistic. In …

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Moving From Crisis to Prosperity Is Our Responsibility

Moving From Crisis to Prosperity Is Our Responsibility

The fundamental economic concepts of trade-offs and opportunity costs have been on trial for several weeks. Sadly, our elected officials have found them wanting.

The outbreak of the Covid-19 virus created a health crisis. Federal and state governments’ reactions to this challenge, however, precipitated an economic and financial crisis that will linger past any recovery from or stabilization of the …

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Freedom to Discover: What Private Giving Made Possible

Freedom to Discover: What Private Giving Made Possible

In the early 1800s, Thomas Jefferson unleashed the power of American philanthropy, though perhaps not in the way he intended.

Jefferson may have been brilliant in penning the mission statement for the United States (…life, liberty and pursuit of happiness…) but he was still a politician and acted as such.

The Founding Father did not like the trustees …

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Community for Liberty – Ideas, Cooperation, and Yes, Tribalism

Community for Liberty – Ideas, Cooperation, and Yes, Tribalism

There is talk these days about tribalism and its negative impact on society. The discussion occurs more frequently within the context of the public square, specifically the perceived deleterious effect on the “public good.”

Certainly, we all could use a reminder that the most important part of “civil society” is being civil.  

That being said, humans are complex. We …

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Mocking Philanthropic Motives Doesn’t Help Anyone

Mocking Philanthropic Motives Doesn’t Help Anyone

Life does not always mimic Robert Frost. We should define ourselves less by our regret over a road not taken, than by those moments along our journey when we were t-boned.

I recognize that time has a way of blurring memories’ edges, and in some cases, obliterating them. Historians spend lifetimes discerning hyperbole, exaggeration, and mistaken identity from so-called reality.…

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DonorsTrust Grows Liberty Beyond Grant-Making

DonorsTrust Grows Liberty Beyond Grant-Making

DonorsTrust argued before the United States Supreme Court earlier this week. We also are engaged in a lawsuit with Harvard University over admission policies that discriminate against Asian-Americans. Let’s not forget we help produce educational materials about the importance of property rights, expressed concern over the uncivil tone that flows through today’s electorate, and we interviewed and recommended 30 people …

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