Category Archives: Liberty Movement

Funding the Faith from All Perspectives

Funding the Faith from All Perspectives

Last week, I attended the Becket Fund’s annual Canterbury Medal Gala. It honors an individual – in this case, Rabbi Dr. Meir Soloveichik – who defends religious liberty and conscience with distinction.

What struck me, was not merely the dinner’s noble purpose, but the fact that the stereotypical joke about the Rabbi, the Priest, and the Iman walking …

read more »
Aiding the Miracle: Two Reasons Why Giving Matters

Aiding the Miracle: Two Reasons Why Giving Matters

Last week, DonorsTrust sponsored the Ricochet Podcast Summit held at the American Enterprise Institute’s beautiful building in downtown Washington, DC. The event showcased thirteen podcasts from the Ricochet network.

I had the privilege of introducing Jonah Goldberg and, in the process, saying few words about DonorsTrust. I used the opportunity – and the excellent segue of the themes Jonah …

read more »
State of DonorsTrust: Growing To Serve the Liberty Community

State of DonorsTrust: Growing To Serve the Liberty Community

The genesis for creating DonorsTrust nearly twenty years ago was the preservation of donor intent.

This was not, however, grounded in blind devotion to the belief that any donor’s intent was to be maintained. Instead, DonorsTrust would safeguard the donor who saw private markets, free exchange, and increased personal responsibility as the keys to progress.

Most importantly, such protection could …

read more »
Fighting O’Sullivan’s Law: Stopping The Drift from Our Principles

Fighting O’Sullivan’s Law: Stopping The Drift from Our Principles

Will a conservative (or, as you might variously describe it, right-of-center, libertarian, or right-wing) organization always keep its rightward orientation?

O’Sullivan’s Law suggests that without a firm mooring, it will easily lose its way. O’Sullivan’s Law, a product of British journalist and former Margaret Thatcher aide John O’Sullivan, states that any organization that is not explicitly right-wing will drift to …

read more »
Free Speech & The Competition Of Ideas

Free Speech & The Competition Of Ideas

Each month, an expert from the liberty movement shares thoughts on how we might be more strategic in our charitable giving. This month, Dr. Wolf von Laer of Students for Liberty shares how we can partner with the student organizations fighting for first amendment rights on American campuses. 

Organizations that promote the ideas of liberty must embody intellectual honesty. Doing …

read more »
Measuring the Impact of Ideas Organizations

Measuring the Impact of Ideas Organizations

As we have previously discussed, donors give for many reasons (you can read about them here and here). Sometimes a donor contributes simply because she knows the organization’s president, or because he merely likes the look of the direct mail package.

Most donors, though, do seek some sort of return on their charitable investment. Of course, the level …

read more »
Battling Regulation Takes Education and Action

Battling Regulation Takes Education and Action

As a continuation of our Expert Giving series, we asked Adam Brandon, the President of FreedomWorks, to frame the current landscape around government regulation and to share his advice on how donors should think about regulatory reform and the different approaches organizations are taking. 

In school, we all learned that Congress makes the laws. Even Schoolhouse Rock sang to children …

read more »
Alma Mater Giving Done Right

Alma Mater Giving Done Right

Colleges and universities may not have been entirely pleased with the recent federal tax overhaul, but they should be quite satisfied with their advancement offices.

America’s higher education institutions are raking in contributions. The Wall Street Journal headline explains it all: Giving to Colleges Jumps 6.3% to Record $43.6 Billion in Fiscal 2017.

Many donors support their alma maters. …

read more »
Lessons in Collaboration from the Top of a Volcano

Lessons in Collaboration from the Top of a Volcano

I climbed a volcano last week. Let’s face it, you’ve probably done something similar, considering most mountains are merely ex-volcanos, or were birthed through volcanic activity. So “climbing a volcano” is not necessarily a big deal.

Except this particular volcano was alive. Not Mt. St. Helens alive, mind you, but it was hard not to miss the consistent spout of …

read more »